Four things your HOA isn’t allowed to do

If you own a Maryland residence, you might be part of a homeowner’s association. Many neighborhoods form these associations to ensure that all members follow a specified set of rules. By following these rules, you get to enjoy the amenities offered by your homeowner’s association. With that said, there are times when an HOA might overstep its boundaries. Here’s a list of things that they are not allowed to do.

Making up reasons for fines

Unfortunately, many homeowner’s associations can punish people for violating rules by having them pay fines. If you receive one of these requests, it’s time to research the covenants, conditions and restrictions sections of your HOA. You can likely appeal this decision if your reason for getting fined isn’t listed in these documents.

Having you take down satellite dishes

Whether you like seeing them or not, many people who need cable television require dishes on their roofs. But, you shouldn’t worry if you receive a request from an HOA to take down your satellite dish. According to the Over-the-Air Reception Devices Rule, no HOA can force you to remove a satellite dish from your home. If this is happening to you, it’s likely a violation of community association laws.

Punishing you for your race or beliefs

One thing that makes the United States great is our freedoms. Considering that, no homeowner’s association can punish you for what you believe in. Under the Fair Housing Act, a homeowner’s association can’t enact rules that single out a group of people.

Requesting that you take down your clotheslines

Many people enjoy drying their clothes in a drier. However, in most cases, you also have the right to hang out your clothes on a clothesline. Maryland is one of 19 states that protect your right to use a clothesline to dry your clothes.

In a perfect world, homeowner’s associations and their members would have no issues with each other. Unfortunately, this relationship isn’t always harmonious. If you’re getting treated unfairly by an HOA, consider contacting a community association attorney.